Photo by Tal Sivan Ziporin

Miriam’s Meatball Sandwiches

Every Friday as she prepared for a big Shabbat dinner, Haim Cohen’s mother would make him a challah sandwich with meatballs studded with onion and parsley.

Photo by Shani Brill

Kofte Tabrizi

This is one of the first incarnations of kubbeh, with the casing made up mainly of meat held together with a small amount of cereal.

Beef-filled Bourekas. Photo by Armando Rafael.

Beef-filled Bourekas

This classic Sephardi recipe for meat-filled pastries has barely changed in 500 years, says food stylist Victoria Granof.

Avikas (White Bean and Beef Stew). Photo by Penny de Los Santos.

Avikas (White Bean and Beef Stew)

A simple stew of beef, white kidney beans, onion, and tomato paste, simmering away on the stove. Perfect for winter days!

Cholent Potpie. Photo by Penny De Los Santos.

Cholent Potpie

Chef Yehuda Sichel’s grandmother used to make cholent that looked like a potpie. Today he makes his own version of it.

Photo by Matan Choufan

Grilled Offal in Pita

During the holiday called Eid al-Adha, is it custom to serve offal for an early lunch. This version is Muzna Bishara’s favorite.

Photography: Dan Peretz, Styling: Nurit Kariv

Bread and Meat Patties

Adding large quantities of bread to meatballs was a practice developed during the frugal years of World War II in British Mandate Palestine.

Photography: Matan Choufan

Pastelicos

Jerusalem-based cook Yedida Dabah, making these Sephardic savory pastries filled with beef and pine nuts, is a way to keep the memory of her mother Dvora alive.

Photography: Matan Choufan

Kubbeh Hamusta

Writer Sherri Ansky describes kubbeh hamusta, a sour soup with meat-filled dumplings, as “a Friday noon-time delicacy.”

Photography: Matan Choufan

Beef and Eggplants Stew

This dish is inspired by one of Jerusalem’s most prominent and important culinary institutions, Azura restaurant in Mahane Yehuda market.

Illustration: Rotem Biksenspaner

Local Beef Bourguignon

A lighter version of the traditional beef stew, this recipe was created by Israeli chef Haim Cohen

Lamb’s neck stuffed with raisins and grapes. Photo by Matan Choufan

Lamb’s Neck Stuffed with Raisins and Grapes

The recipe is inspired by one called bidaya wan nihaya (meaning “beginning and end”), nods to the use of grapes (the beginning) and raisins (the end).