Photo by Amir Menachem

Hours and Location

Who We Are

Asif is a non-profit organization and culinary center in Tel Aviv dedicated to cultivating and nurturing Israel’s diverse and creative food culture, a joint venture of the New York City-based Jewish Food Society and Tel Aviv’s Start-Up Nation Central.

Our aim is to explore local food culture and provide a home for research, dialogue, and a wide range of culinary experiences. Through a library with 1500+ culinary books, revolving exhibitions, cooking workshops, a rooftop farm, and pop-ups hosted by local and international chefs, Asif will help document and articulate the evolving Israeli kitchen. The center is open six days a week and everyone is welcome. Stop by for a meal anytime at Cafe Asif, which is operated by the beloved Puaa group from Jaffa, or visit their local deli to pick up artisanal cheeses, olive oils, spices, and wine to enjoy at home. 

At Asif, we believe that food is a central ingredient of culture and identity, both as individuals and communities. Beyond cooking, food enables us to learn about our histories, confront our conflicts, and engage in an open dialogue and difficult conversations.

Set out for a meal in Israel today and you may find bowls of Iraqi kubbeh soup tinged pink with beets or still-warm hummus alongside raw onion, sandwiches of matjes herring and butter or pitas stuffed with schnitzel and pickles, lightly cured fish in verdant olive oil with Mandarin zest, and trays of glazed rugelach. This nascent kitchen is influenced by regional Levantine and local Palestinian traditions, recipes from across the Jewish Diaspora, and a unique terroir. It has deep ties to the diverse histories and traditions that make up the Israeli population, but feels fresh and modern in the hands of home cooks and creative chefs.

Food does not stand alone. Exploring how it relates to history, culture, politics, ecology, fashion, technology, and gender is what guides Asif as a culinary center that encourages innovation.

A Note on Language: The Asif website is currently available in Hebrew and English. We are working towards translating sections of the site into Arabic, as well. Please check back for more updates soon. 

Our Team

Naama Shefi

Executive Director & Founder

Naama Shefi is a kibbutznik and New Yorker, whose work sits at the intersection of food, culture, community building, and art. In 2017, she founded the Jewish Food Society, which preserves and celebrates Jewish culinary heritage through a digital recipe archive and dynamic events. Previously, she curated programs promoting Israeli and Jewish culinary culture through the hit pop-up The Kubbeh Project and the Israeli Consulate in New York. Naama also immersed herself in start-up culture as the marketing director of EatWith, which hosts pop-ups in 160 cities. Food, she believes, is one of the most profound ways to build community. 

“My first bite after touching down in Israel is usually herring. It could be on a fresh baguette at Sherry Herring, or a quick stop before Shabbat at Dorfman at the Carmel Market. In the market, I always make sure to visit Elad for “hetzi manah” or a half portion of falafel. In the evening I head to Abie — a restaurant that personifies what Israeli food can be in 2021.”


Neta Shalev Corry

COO

A Tel Avivian by birth, Neta Shalev Corry has worked in startups in Israel and New York City for more than a decade. She worked as the head of video programming at AOL/Huffington Post, a program manager at Fiverr, and most recently as the strategic project lead for Urban 95, a non-profit venture of the Tel Aviv-Yafo municipality and the Bernard Van Leer Foundation. Outside of work she loves to eat, drink wine, run, and travel — back in the before times.

“I’m obsessed with the coffee and the people of WayCup, love everything that the Doktor brothers are doing in their restaurants (Abie, Dok, Haachim), and believe every trip up north requires a stop at Sharabic — Galilean food at its finest.”


Ayelet Latovitch

Culinary Director

In 1993, Ayelet set off for culinary school in London, returning to Israel at the start of the Israeli culinary scene. She’s since worked as a private chef for the British ambassador, written for Israel’s leading culinary publication HaShulchan, cooked at hit restaurants Keren and Lilith, appeared in the TV program “Garlic, Pepper, and Olive Oil” with Gil Hovav, and grew a small cafe called Beta into a beloved collection of neighborhood spots around Tel Aviv. Her cooking style is rich in vegetables and grounded in a deep respect for raw ingredients.

“Up north, you can find me in the markets of Nazareth buying fresh garlic and green chickpeas for Passover Seder. Down south, I always stop at Kornmehl Farm for goat cheese and then head to Kibbutz Neot Smadar for fruit juices and to explore dessert agriculture.”


Ronit Vered

Exhibition Curator &

Senior Content Consultant

Ronit Vered is a food and culture researcher, journalist, and author of food and travel books. Her weekly column “Pinat Ochel” in Haaretz has documented local food traditions since 2007. She is a frequent lecturer both in Israel and abroad on cuisine and identity, food and politics, and the growth of Israeli and Palestinian cuisines. She also serves a curator, building artistic and culinary programs for cultural institutions like Asif, Tel Aviv University, the Jerusalem Cinematheque, and others. 

“You can find me enjoying a meal at Sharabic in the Galilean town of Rameh, shopping in the old city market of Nazareth, enjoying a drink at the bar at Amiram and snacking on bourekas at Dilek’s Turkish Bakery.”


Matan Choufan

Director of Content

Born and raised in Eilat to a Tunisian family, Matan Choufan is a culinary expert and journalist based in Givatayim. He previously worked as the deputy editor at Israel’s premier culinary magazine, HaShulchan and as a regular contributor to Haaretz’s weekend magazine. He is a graduate of Tel Aviv University and the Danon Culinary School. Find his writing, recipes, and food photography on his website and Instagram account

“I shop for spices at Habshush, order my organic vegetables from Havivian and love to eat at Brut restaurant — at the bar, of course.”


Michal Levit

Public Programs and Library Manager

Food writer and culinary event producer Michal Levit was born and raised in Tel Aviv in a Latvian-Ukrainian home. She graduated from the University of Gastronomic Sciences in Italy and traveled the globe in search of small-scale food producers. In 2011, she opened Ha’Meorav, a small street food spot from the team behind HaBasta. Her writing has appeared in HaShulchan, Mako, Time Out Tel Aviv, and As Promised. Check out her 2018 YouTube series Michal-Love It, which explores the best of Israeli food.

“My second home, or even my first, is HaBasta restaurant in Tel Aviv. When I need a good pita I go to Jasmino. When I’m up north, I cannot miss the family bakery Al-Mashdawi in Nazareth and Rutenberg restaurant, located right on the border with Jordan.”


Dr. Muzna Bishara

Content Manager

Born and raised in the Arab village of Kfar Qara in the Triangle region, Muzna is a practicing dentist, but her love of cooking and history led her to change directions and start researching the roots of the Palestinian kitchen. She teaches workshops and offers lectures that share traditional recipes and the stories behind them. She co-founded Sir Lasalam (A Pot for Peace) an Arab-Jewish coexistence project along with Dafi Kremer. Muzna was also a contestant on the popular TV show ‘MasterChef.’

“Nazareth my favorite local city for food. At El Meshhdawi bakery, I always order the chicory and labneh sandwich and I make sure to stop at Abu Ashraf’s amazing restaurant for atayef. For a fancy dinner, I love Magdalena by Zozo Hanna and Luna Bistro. Both serve traditional local Arab dishes in a modern and sophisticated way.”


Devra Ferst

Editorial & Strategic Consultant

Devra Ferst is a food writer and editor based in Brooklyn, NY. A former editor at Eater and Tasting Table, her food and travel reporting has also appeared in the New York Times, Vogue, Food & Wine, NPR, and numerous other publications. She is currently the editor of the Jewish Food Society, which preserves and celebrates Jewish family recipes from around the world. When she’s not writing (and it’s safe to travel again), you can find her exploring produce markets from Odessa to Bangkok. 

“Whenever I visit Israel, I head straight for cheese-filled bourekas at Bourekas Levinsky, a gazoz at Cafe Levinsky 41 and a year’s worth of za’atar from Habshush in Tel Aviv and Elbabour in Nazareth.”


Shay Li Hearsch

Operations Associate

Shay Li grew up in Binyamina running barefoot among pecan and pear trees. For her, moving to Tel Aviv was a breathtaking experience. While training as an actress at Yoram Loewenstein Studio, she visited every restaurant possible. Over the past decade, she’s combined a career in acting with one as an event manager. Today, she’s bringing together that experience with her passion for food at Asif. 

“A perfect evening with friends, for me, is at Batshon, a restaurant located over a great fish shop in Tel Aviv. With my family, I will always find myself at Keton Restaurant for chopped liver with horseradish, cholent, and a bite of schnitzel I sneak from my kids’ plates.”


Ori Kroll

Content Associate

Raised in the Galilee among her family’s fields, Ori Kroll developed a strong affinity for sustainable living at a young age. A Tel Avivian today, Ori bridges two worlds professionally: one as a dancer and the other as an illustrator. She’s danced with Batsheva Dance Company, Gaga Ltd, and Noa Zuk, and worked as the illustrator and photographer for the Doktor Brothers restaurants (aka Dok, Abie, Haachim). Today she balances teaching contemporary dance with her role at Asif. 

“In the Galilee, I love Ezba Restaurant, which celebrates seasonal and local Arabic cuisine. For an elegant dinner, I’m always sure to stop at Michael Local Bistro near the coast and if I’m not the one driving, a glass of locally-made eau de vie from Julius Distillery is a must.”

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